Lineup

The Revivalists

Chart-topping rock band The Revivalists had been grinding for 10 years when their now platinum-selling single “Wish I Knew You” took off,setting a record for most single-week spins ever at Alternative Radio and becoming a mainstream phenomenon spending 9 weeks on the BillboardHot 100. Now,their new hit songs from fourth studio albumTake Good Care, including #1 Triple A and Top 5 Alternative single “All My Friends,”and #1 Triple A and Top 15 Alternative hit single “Change” (their third Mediabase Triple A #1 in a row) –have become instant fan favorites and are adding to their more than 410 million total streams. Theband has performed on numerous television shows including Austin City Limits,The Late Show with Stephen Colbert , Jimmy Kimmel LIVE!, Ellen, TODAY, and garnered major media attention from the likes of Rolling Stone, NPR, Billboard, Buzzfeed, Entertainment Weekly, USA Today, Forbes, Salon, HuffPost, Grammy.com, Alternative Press, Paste, UPROXX, Flaunt, Nylon, Interview, and more. They made a big statement in support of the anti-gun violence movement with their powerful song “Shoot You Down” which they performed during their debut at Lollapalooza, opened for the Rolling Stones, were nominated for aBillboard Music Awardand two iHeartRadio Music Awards, were named Billboard’s Top New Rock Artist of 2017, and between sold-out shows at their biggest venues yet, including Beacon Theatre and Red Rocks, the band has also ignited festival stages at Bonnaroo, Governor’s Ball, Lollapalooza, New Orleans Jazz Fest, Outside Lands, and Pilgrimage.Renowned for their live firepower, soulful alt-rock anthems, and their distinct mix of many of the classic styles of American music, the 8-piece ensemble of pedal steel guitar, unique two-drummer set-up, horns, and more is led by the incredible voice of front man David Shaw.Most recently, the band released their Made In Muscle Shoals live studio EP and accompanying documentary, which was recorded and filmed at the legendary FAME Recording Studio in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and directed by Jay Sansone of Human Being Media. Capturing the essence of The Revivalists at this exciting time in their 10-year journey, the Made In Muscle Shoals EP features brilliant re-imaginings of the band’s hits “Oh No,” “You & I,” “Change,” and “All My Friends” from Take Good Care, as well as a soulful rendition of The Bee Gees’ “To Love Somebody,” a gorgeous stripped down piano-and-vocal take of “Wish I Knew You,” and a never-before-released, brand new song “Bitter End.” The Revivalists also established their philanthropic umbrella fund, Rev Causes, which supports the essential work of organizations dedicated to reviving and investing in our communities, health, and environment. $1 from every ticket sold will be donated to a variety of organizations that are close to the band’s heart, including Center for Disaster Philanthropy, Everytown For Gun Safety Support Fund, National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Songs for Kids Foundation, and Upturn Arts. The Revivalists are: David Shaw [lead vocals, guitar], Zack Feinberg [guitar],Andrew Campanelli [drums], George Gekas [bass], Ed Williams [pedal steel guitar], Rob Ingraham [saxophone], Michael Girardot [keyboard, trumpet], and PJ Howard [drums, percussion].

Lotus

Lotus is a five-piece instrumental band formed while members were in college and has evolved and grown over 20 plus years. They were early adopters of using electronic beats and sounds from dance music with jam music, but also draw on psych-rock, post-rock, disco, funk, and jazz. Their dance-inducing, high energy shows have made them festival favorites

The band cut its teeth on the road building up a loyal fanbase by word of mouth. They also have released a steady stream of studio albums that showcase the band’s diverse musical tastes and production styles. The latest pair of albums, Free Swim (2020) and Citrus (2021), were tracked live in the studio and highlight the band’s groove and improvisational sides.

In 2021Lotuswelcomed new lead guitarist Tim Palmieri to the group. Tim has been a pillar of the scene for two decades known for his virtuosic playing and melodic improvisation. He has brought a new energy to the stage and will be featured on the band’s upcoming 2022 studio album.

The first incarnation of Lotus came together for a music showcase in 1998 at Goshen College in Indiana. Albums such as their debut studio release, Nomad (2006) have become a touchstone for how to organically fuse elements of electronica with jam music. Over the last two decades, Lotus has toured actively throughout the US working their way up from dingy basement clubs to world-class venues such as Red Rocks. They’ve become festival favorites, playing everything from Bonnaroo, Camp Bisco and Outside Lands to Ultra Music Festival and Electric Forest, building a hyper-loyal following along the way. The band also hosts their own annual summer dance Festival in Garrettsville, Ohio. A Lotus live show is an experience, a uniquely crafted and improvised set taking everyone, the crowd and band, on a journey

Lettuce

“Dealing with the pandemic, being in separate places, trying to survive without our best friends, without touring, not to mention the political divide in this country,” says Lettuce drummer Adam Deitch. “We really needed to unify.”
So, here it is, right on time. Unify. The eighth studio album from Lettuce, it’s also a third consecutive record made at Denver’s Colorado Sound Studios, completing a loose trilogy starting with 2019’s Grammy-nominated Elevate, and continuing with 2020’s Resonate.
It’s, as well, a benchmark moment for the sextet: Adam Deitch (drums), Ryan Zoidis (saxophone), Adam Smirnoff (guitar), Erick Coomes (bass), Nigel Hall (keyboards/vocals), Eric ‘Benny’ Bloom (trumpet). Approaching thirty years since its humble Boston beginnings, the relentlessly soulful funk outfit has essentially lived on the road, embodying, night after night, the sly wink of its moniker: Let us play! And now, endorsed on Unify by none other than the legendary icon of funk, Bootsy Collins, singing and playing bass on “Keep That Funk Alive”.
“We dreamed this up when we were teenagers, and here we are. We’re doing it,” says Zoidis.
The roots of Unify took hold several years back, when Lettuce assembled at Colorado Sound to begin work on Elevate. Armed with dozens of songs, the band tracked enough material for that record, its successor, and then some (including a vinyl-only, 45-minute, live-in-the-studio, one-take improvisation, Vibe). A pandemic-abbreviated European tour schedule in 2021 further inspired, as the group traded ideas for more new material.
Combined with some stellar pre-existing tracks held over from the prior two albums, Lettuce was now primed for a third. The group decamped to the Denver studio and reunited with its esteemed engineer, Jesse O’Brien, mixing alongside O’Brien, and, once again, self-producing the finished work. And, rather than extensively road-testing the songs- fleshing out the repertoire in countless performances on tour before being recorded- this time the band discovered the music as much as made it; essentially debuting the new material as they tracked it live in the studio.
A totally collaborative effort, there were exciting cuts full of brilliant lyrics and arrangements from Hall (whom Coomes calls “one of the greatest singers ever”). And fiery horn parts from Bloom. Plus, the tantalizing prospect of unveiling it all on the upcoming tour. “It’s very, very exciting. Our audiences are going to hear how we end up interpreting these songs for the first time, in the live form, and then for the 300th time; they’ll get to hear right along with us how the songs will morph and evolve,” says Smirnoff.
Adds Coomes, “We’re just getting tighter and tighter. Really, these are the first records made with the six of us as a team, and it’s the best the band has ever been: live and in the studio; the funkiest and the most fun.”
Epitomizing the funk and the fun, it’s impossible for “Keep That Funk Alive,” not to be a focus track, even on a 16-song album full of highlights. Inspired by a buoyant Bootsy Instagram post, and an irrepressible groove crafted around it. The venerable Parliament-Funkadelic bassist dug the hybridized creation, laying down low end and vocals on the proper track. “It’s such a dream to have one of the inventors of funk music bless this album. We are all STILL in awe!” exclaims the band.
This album is an expression that is pure Lettuce. Unify will teleport you to a funky galaxy far, far away, where all life coexists as one in peace, love, harmony, and music!

Andy Frasco & The U.N.

For better or worse, Andy Frasco has been married to the music industry since before he could grow facial hair. At just sixteen, Frasco worked for labels like Drive-Thru Records and Capitol, booking nationwide tours for his pop-punk heroes and wheeling and dealing on calls he’d take on the sly during lunch. He’s been on road since he was 19 with his band Andy Frasco & the U.N., played over 250 shows per year for more than decade, lived on bad bar food, and slept in vans, and now, after more than a decade on the musical grind, he’s finally finding himself.

The culmination of those efforts is Wash, Rinse, Repeat, which drops April 8th via his own label, Fun Machine Records. “This was my chance to learn my craft and fall in love with song writing again,” he says. “This is me. This is how I feel. I’m not trying to write songs for other people anymore. I’m just trying to write songs that help me. And hopefully through that, help others, too.”
Written across the country with members of Dashboard Confessional, 3oh!3, Doom Flamingo, AWOLnation, and more, the record is a portrait of Frasco as a musician—and a man. Dealing with everything from addiction (“Spill the Beans”) to breaking old romantic habits (“Grow Old”) to fighting through the bad days to find the good (“Puff Break (Believe That)”), Wash, Rinse, Repeat stands as Frasco’s most complete, mature effort yet. With Bonnaroo and touring on the horizon, Frasco is ready for people to stop thinking of him as a party-boy front man with a yen for stagediving and to listen to his words

Sierra Hull

Sierra Hull’s positively stellar career started early.  That is, if you consider a Grand Ole Opry debut at age 10, called back to the famed stage a year later to perform with her hero and mentor Alison Krauss to be early.  She played Carnegie Hall at 12; at 13 signed with Rounder Records and issued her debut, Secrets, and garnered the first of many nominations for Mandolin Player of the Year.  She played the Kennedy Center at 16 and the next year became the first bluegrass musician to receive a Presidential Scholarship at the Berklee College of Music.  As a 20-year-old, Hull played the White House.

It’s only a two-hour drive to Nashville from her tiny hometown hamlet of Byrdstown, Tennessee.  Hull credits her family for paving the first few miles to Music Row.  Her mother, holding her as a toddler, taught her to sing.  She ran next door to hear Uncle Junior pick mandolin, and listened intently to the church choir on Sundays.  Her Christmas gift- a full-sized fiddle- proved too daunting.  While waiting for a smaller replacement, her father showed her some notes on the mandolin.  Hull was hooked, soon known as the eight-year-old wowing the locals at bluegrass jams.

She found inspiration in Krauss, Ricky Skaggs, and Sam Bush.  And, just as importantly, affirmed her own sense of identity in the album covers of Rhonda Vincent, the queen of bluegrass.  She heard the words of her parents, prepping her for life’s big moments yet to come, repeatedly instilling the mantra:  Hard work, more than anything, will get you somewhere.  It certainly did.

In 2010, Hull captured her first IBMA award for Recorded Event of the Year.  She was shedding the prodigy tag, turning virtuoso, and releasing her second album, Daybreak, with seven of her own original compositions.  In Byrdstown, she hosted an eponymous annual bluegrass festival.

“There’s a voice in the back of my head telling me to keep working, to keep moving forward,” Hull says.  “You have to keep progressing and introducing new things.”

By 2016, Hull had reached a more mature place in her life and in her art.  She tapped legendary bluegrass musician Bela Fleck to produce her third album, Weighted Mind.  A departure from her opening pair of records that blended progressive elements with traditional structure, Hull let go of whatever preconceptions existed- both hers and those of her audience- and birthed a Grammy-nominated masterpiece.

“I created from a more vulnerable, honest place by asking myself what kind of music will I make if I’m not at all concerned with genre,” says Hull.  “What do I want to say with my music?  What do I want to feel when I stand onstage and sing these songs?  I needed to have a deeper connection.”

Enlisting bassist Ethan Jodziewicz (and Fleck on two cuts), and harnessing vocal contributions from KraussAbigail Washburn, and Rhiannon Giddens, Hull trusted her foundation of influences to support this artistic leap.  Months later she was taking home the Mandolin Player of the Year.  After a near-decade of consecutive noms, Hull broke that last glass ceiling, becoming the first woman to win the prestigious title.  Of all the numerous awards and achievements Sierra Hull has earned, that one occupies a special place on the mantel.  Then she took home a pair to join it, winning again in 2017 and 2018.

Hull has maintained a rigorous touring schedule, as well.  Even when off the road, she is frequently guesting with friends and legends, joining such icons as the Indigo Girls, Garth Brooks, and Gillian Welch, and performing at the Country Music Awards with Skaggs, Brad Paisley, and Marty Stuart.

She says she’s ready, now, for something new.  Currently in the midst of work for the follow-up to Weighted Mind, her next album will consist of all original songs.  Beyond that, there are tantilizing ideas she won’t divulge for collaborations and, perhaps, an all-instrumental record.  There is a plan, but not a timetable, which is just fine.

“I love playing music.  It’s all I ever wanted to do.  I don’t see it, necessarily, as a bad thing that I’m slow to make albums.  I want my albums to be something I can be proud of.”

Dancing Bears

While this band out of Baltimore’s main focus is helping to connect the music of the Grateful Dead to the younger generation of live music fans, Deadheads of all ages come out to enjoy a fantastic night of live music! Dancing Bears – Grateful Dead Tribute are:

-Jon Wood- guitar, vocals (Electric Love Machine, Psycho Killers- Talking Heads Tribute, Phoam- Phish Tribute, Feinwood)

-Jon Brady- keyboard, vocals (Electric Love Machine, Psycho Killers- Talking Heads Tribute, Phoam- Phish Tribute, Mark Datter)

-Alex Lang- bass (Electric Love Machine)

-Nathan Shulkin- drums (Squaring the Circle)

-Ari Lesser- guitar, vocals (Puremotion, Greasy Hands)

 

Kat Riggins
Moody Moose

The four members of Moody Moose – MacRae Collie (guitar/vocals), JC Senatore (keyboard/vocals), Colin Sheehan (bass), and Jason Heilbrunn (drums/vocals) – grew up in the Baltimore area and have been playing music together for years. The band reunited in 2016 after attending different universities with a renewed inspiration to create a unique sound. The quartet brings head-bob-inducing, high energy funk, jazz, blues, and improvisational compositions to listeners’ ears. Their influences stem from a wide range of artists such as Phish, The Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, and many others. Moody Moose looks forward to building on the momentum of their live shows, having already shared the stage with bands such as The Bridge, Kung Fu, Aqueous, Electric Love Machine, and Tweed, and having played venues such as The 8×10, Baltimore Soundstage, The Recher, and Pearl Street Warehouse.

Natalie Brooke

Natalie Brooke brings the dance, the funk, & rock and roll to the stage as one of DC’s most prominent and exciting keyboard/synth players. Her sets feature original music that is energetic, dramatic and varied in style; commanding female led vocals; and extended jams where she and the boys take the audience on electrifying musical journeys.

Natalie Brooke as an artist has performed with Everyone Orchestra alongside Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Josh Shwartz (Turkuaz) and Robert Randolph, and opened up for bands such as Tauk, Spafford, Space Bacon, and Electric Love Machine.